Living Arroyos
Join us for our next volunteer workday and help clean up the creek in your back yard!
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Living Arroyos New Intern!

You may have met her already, but we at Living Arroyos are happy to introduce our new intern—

Charlie Chesney!

CharliesPhoto

Charlie joined the Living Arroyos team as a Park Enhancement Aid in January 2017. She graduated from San Francisco State University in May 2015 with a BS in Biology and Zoology. Since then, she has counted migrating raptors in Yellowstone and worked with California Condors in Big Sur. Charlie will be continuing her conservation education in graduate school this fall. In her free time, Charlie explores Livermore’s trails, is learning how to sew, and spends time with her three cats.

Please give Charlie a warm welcome to the Living Arroyos Program!

Living Arroyos Volunteers Participate in Weed Control Efforts

After canceling the last two volunteer workdays due to weather conditions, the Living Arroyos Program was happy to host their 6th volunteer event on Saturday, February 4th.  A total of 26 volunteers met at the Arroyo Mocho Stanly Reach project site at 9 AM, traveling from distances as far as Moraga, CA to Fremont, CA.

College roommates reconnect at Living Arroyos volunteer event

College roommates reconnect at Living Arroyos volunteer event

The Living Arroyos field crew had two goals in mind for this particular workday.

Our primary goal was to remove invasive plant species that compete with the hundreds of native trees we’ve planted for space, nutrients, water and light. With a quick visual assessment of the riparian habitat at Stanley Reach, it is obvious that wild radish is the dominant invasive plant species on site. This broadleaf plant can grow up to 2 feet tall and can be susceptible to several diseases and pests that could cause harm to our native trees.

Volunteers hand removing invasive plant species

Volunteers hand removing invasive plant species

Our second goal was to remove large piles of wooden debris that was washed on site as a result of recent rainstorms. Piles of wooden debris have completely covered or caused damage to many of the trees planted closest to the water channel.

Volunteers removing wooden debris

Volunteers removing wooden debris

Our plan of action was to sustainably remove unwanted plant material by hand. At the end of the workday, volunteers removed 490 gallons of wild radish plants and 1,125 gallons of wooden debris.

We want to send our warmest gratitude to our volunteers for their hard work and dedication toward improving riparian habitat and water quality conditions within the Livermore-Amador Valley. You all are TRULY AMAZING!!!

Piles of wooden debris _ before

Piles of wooden debris _ before

Wooden debris_ after

Wooden debris_ after

 

Arroyo Mocho at Stanley Reach: Stream Bank Protection

Thank you Jesse from Shelterbelt Builders Inc. for our Willow Fascine Installation Training! We are hoping that these willow bundles will sprout and protect the Arroyo Mocho bank from continued erosion.

Step 1: Create a neat pile of small willow branches

Step 1: Create a neat pile of small willow branches

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 2: Bind willow branches together with rope

Step 2: Bind willow branches together with rope

Step 3: Transport willow fascine to the designated installation area

Step 3: Transport willow fascine to the designated installation area

Step 4: Place willow fascine along streambank

Step 4: Place willow fascine along streambank

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 5: Install willow fascine

Step 5: Install willow fascine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 6: Secure willow fascine

Step 6: Secure willow fascine

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Step 7: Layer second willow bundle on top of the first bundle to enhance streambank protection from erosion.

Step 7: Layer second willow bundle on top of the first bundle to enhance streambank protection from erosion.